Bramling

Bramling was a popular and prolific hop in England around the turn of the 20th century and it is known to have been widely cultivated by 1865 for use in golden and rye ales primarily. But its increasingly low yield has caused it to fall out of favor. It is grown in British Columbia for Canadian breweries desiring aroma hops. Its origin is unknown. Its profile is of very low alpha acids and moderately low cohumulone. It is said to have a pleasant European aroma profile.

Also Known As
Characteristics Pleasant European aroma
Purpose Aroma
Alpha Acid Composition 5.8%
Beta Acid Composition 3%
Co-Humulone Composition 27%
Country UK
Cone Size
Cone Density
Seasonal Maturity Early
Yield Amount 670-1120 kg/hectare (600-1000 lbs/acre)
Growth Rate Low
Resistant to Resistant to verticillium wilt
Susceptible to Moderately susceptible to downy mildew
Storability Retains 76% alpha acid after 6 months storage at 20ºC (68ºF)
East of Harvest
Total Oil Composition 0.90 mL/100g
Myrcene Oil Composition
Humulene Oil Composition
Caryophyllene Oil
Farnesene Oil
Substitutes Whitbread Golding, Progress, East Kent Golding
Style Guide Golden Ale, Bitter, Rye Ale, India Pale Ale, Stout, Golden Ale, Imperial Stout, Pale Ale, Holiday Ale

References

http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/person/2450/hopcultivars/21284.html

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