Target

English dual-use variety Target was released in 1992 and features a lineage including Northern Brewer and Eastwell Golding. Though being somewhat closely related, Target’s cousin, Challenger is considerably different. Target’s popularity has gone up and down over the years but it now seems to be popular with craft brewers, being used in Green Man Ale’s IPA in Asheville, North Carolina …

Tettnanger (Swiss)

While it was initially thought to be the same variety as the original German Tettnanger, the Swiss-grown version is now considered to be genetically unique. While the original variety is also known to be cultivated in Switzerland, much of the branded Tettnanger (Swiss) product is actually Fuggle-derived. Despite this, it is higher yielding than its German Tettnanger counterpart and features …

Pacific Gem

Pacific Gem is a New Zealand hops variety of interesting character. Bred at the New Zealand Horticultural Research Centre as a triploid cross between Smooth Cone, California Late Cluster and Fuggle, it is used around the world in various styles but most notably in European lagers. It was released in 1987. Despite its high alpha acids its high cohumulone content …

Mount Rainier

Like Mount Hood, Mount Rainier is named after one of the many active volcanoes in Washington State. Born out of the USDA-ARS hop breeding program in collaboration with Oregon State University, Mount Rainier is the progeny of Magnum and a USDA male. It has noble, Hallertau-like aroma characteristics alongside notes of citrus and a hint of licorice. It is excellent …

Golding (US)

Golding (US) hops are descended from the original East Kent Golding. In North America, they were first grown in British Columbia, and then appeared in the state of Washington in 1993 and Oregon after that. They are no longer grown commercially in Canada. They feature a subtle bitterness when used as a early addition but are predominantly used for their …

Fuggle

The Fuggle hop originates in England and was first discovered in 1861 in a hop yard owned by George Stace in Kent. Some 14 years later it was officially named and introduced by Richard Fuggle of Benchley in 1875. Similar to a Styrian Golding, is noted for its distinct European aroma and has enjoyed a long, versatile run. At its …

British Columbia Golding

British Columbia Golding is produced, as one might expect, in Canada. Before the hops industry was fully established in the Pacific Northwest, BC Golding was the only North American-grown Golding. Its alphas are low so it’s bittering capacity is mild at best while it puts forward an earthy aroma profile and flavors of smooth, rounded spice. BC Golding makes a …